• Phoebus Tian

How to Flourish in Spring with Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine

Updated: Mar 18

In Chinese medicine, the body was thought of as a tiny reflection of the universe. A whole cosmos functioning within us. We, too, go through cycles in our lives. The summer brings forth abundant vitality; however, the winter necessitates rest and recovery.


The season cycle begins in spring when new life is born, and new beginnings arrive. It's also the energy of the element Wood. This is the power that causes fresh vegetation to push through the snow, creating new leaves out of old wood. It does this so nature may absorb the nutrients it requires to grow.


1. Spring is a time for renewal and growth, so it's important to take care of ourselves. Spring is a time for renewal and growth, so it's essential to take care of ourselves during this time and make sure we're getting the most out of the season. Here are some tips for taking care of yourself during springtime:


2. The Chinese Medicine perspective on spring

I am writing this article to contribute to your deeper understanding of health and wellness. The idea that certain seasons produce different effects on one's health and energy is almost universal in medicine systems around the world, even though it may be expressed or communicated slightly differently from place to place. What we will be talking about here is the effect of season on one's vitality, particularly after age 40 for men and age 50 for women when the hormonal decline begins, but first let us establish some basic principles:


3. How to be more in tune with your body during the season

Anger is the emotion associated with the Liver's function of smooth Qi (vital energy) flow. We become stagnant and cannot develop when we fail to communicate our anger/frustration. This inability to adequately express oneself can result in one or more of the following symptoms: headaches/migraines, menstrual or gynaecological problems, PMS, difficulty adjusting to change, sadness...

In the Huang Di Nei Jing (Yellow Emperor's Inner Classic), there is a famous eight-character statement that says 春生, 夏長, 秋收, 冬藏 – "Spring gives birth, summer blooms, fall harvests, and winter stores." The Neijing advises that you go to bed later in the night but get up earlier. Take a walk in the courtyard as soon as you wake up. Loosen your hair and relax your body, allowing your concentration to focus on life.


4. Eat light foods that are easy on digestion, like salads and soups

Spring is the season to eat smaller meals than those consumed in the winter. Salads and soups are great options for light springtime meals because they are healthy and easy to digest. Salads are packed with nutrients like vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Eat Salads for the Fiber. It isn't easy to comprehend that something we can't even consume is beneficial to us! Consuming a high-fibre diet might help reduce cholesterol levels and prevent constipation.


5. The 5 Elements in Chinese Medicine

The five elements theory is a Chinese philosophy that focuses on the interactions and relationships between things. The five elements—wood, fire, earth, metal, and water —are considered the fundamental components of everything in existence, from which interactions occur. The harmonious balance of 'the five elements is a vital component of a healthy life.


The future of wood energy is bright, with a strong, direct assertive energy making no apologies for pushing things out of its way. A tree is an excellent example of the Wood element. A tree begins as a seedling prodded up through the earth by the power of the Wood element and spring's energy. A flourishing, robust, flexible and firmly planted tree thrives.

The Wood energy is also part of our bodies' acupuncture meridians, the Liver and Gall Bladder. Chinese medicine views the body's internal organs as part of a larger framework. Each meridian is believed to have a function in the body's kingdom, which is based on the idea that each meridian has a role in the body's realm. The Gall Bladder meridian is "The Upright Official who Excels in Judgment", and the Liver is "The Official in Charge of Planning".


6. How to use the five elements in your daily life for spring

1. Get outside and enjoy the fresh air.

Spring is a great time to get outside and enjoy the fresh air. Go for a walk, take a bike ride, or sit in the sun and relax. Getting some exercise outdoors is a great way to take advantage of the warmer weather and get some vitamin D too.


2. Make time for self-care.

Spring can be a busy time, but it's important to make time for yourself. Schedule in some relaxation time each day, whether that means reading a book, taking a bath, or meditation.


3. Acupressure

The concept is that blood and Qi (vital energy) flow through the body via the Channels, which are pathways that acupuncturists stimulate with needles. Although needles are a valuable tool for channel balance, they are invasive and can only be done in a clinical setting by trained practitioners. Fingers, on the other hand, maybe utilized as needle alternatives for acupressure. In the spring, acupressure can be used to guarantee efficient Liver qi circulation.

Taichong (LR3)



This point can be stimulated a few times a day. Apply pressure to the point with your thumb until a mild soreness or numbness is felt. Maintain pressure for 20 to 30 seconds before releasing and repeating 5-10 times.


7. Herbal drinks for spring


Dandelions

Dandelion can be eaten, taken in tea or as a supplement. Traditionally it has a cooling property. It can clear Heat and Toxins in the Blood.


Chrysanthemum flower

It's one of the best herbs to clear Liver heat and soothe the mood in TCM. You can get it from any Asian supermarket. Chamomile tea is an alternative option. They have similar properties.


8. Get lots of exercises to keep our energy levels up! Walking, hiking or yoga are all great options


9. Take some time for yourself every day to practice meditation or deep breathing exercises


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