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Obesity makes cancer more dangerous

One in three women and half of the men will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. The danger is that cancer cells can sometimes spread from the location of the primary tumour to other parts of the body, causing a more widespread invasion.



Fortunately, when the tumour is confined to a very small area, it can be removed with the help of surgery, chemotherapy and other treatments. The danger, however, is that cancer cells can sometimes spread from the location of the primary tumour to other parts of the body, causing more widespread invasion and making treatment more difficult. 90% of cancer deaths are caused by metastasis of cancer cells.


It has been clinically observed that in some cancers, obesity has a higher incidence and a higher risk of metastasis. In triple-negative breast cancer, for example, this type is highly aggressive, and the risk and prognosis are related to the patient's level of obesity.


Scientists have focused on the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The extracellular matrix is a mixture of collagen, elastin, laminin, enzymes and other glycoproteins that provide support for cell growth. In tumour tissue, the ECM also provides an essential microenvironment for the growth and invasion of tumour cells.


The results obtained from the mouse experiments have received some initial validation in samples from human patients. The researchers examined biopsies from patients with triple-negative breast cancer with varying degrees of obesity. They found that the higher the BMI, the higher the level of collagen VI in the area surrounding the tumour.

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